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Let’s Get There Before Stage 4

submitted by MJ, Vancouver BC

I noticed the beginning of my struggles with mental health as having immense worry and anxiety that bad things were going to happen. The anxiety grew into an increasing fear of contamination that triggered obsessive hand washing and avoidance of places and touching things. Growing up in a family with parents that struggled immensely with their ability to parent, I found myself living my younger years in the wake of adversity. At the time in which I began overeating to find comfort when loneliness and misery would surface, I was not aware that this was a problem. Retrospectively, I see this as the beginning of my eating disorder. I began to be suicidal around the age of thirteen when things in my home had escalated and when my lack of safety became pertinent to me. I left home at the mere age of fifteen seeking a place of security, to later be placed in foster care residing in a group home.

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Let’s Get There Before Stage 4
Let’s Get There Before Stage 4

Nurse-Family Partnerships

[embedlycard url="http://childhealthpolicy.ca/nurse-family-partnership/"]

Nurse-Family Partnerships
Nurse-Family Partnerships

National Anti-Poverty Plan

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National Anti-Poverty Plan
National Anti-Poverty Plan

Child and youth mental health in Canada

[embedlycard url="https://www.cihi.ca/en/child-and-youth-mental-health-in-canada-infographic"]

Child and youth mental health in Canada
Child and youth mental health in Canada

13 Canadians hospitalized each day for opioid poisoning

[embedlycard url="https://www.cihi.ca/en/13-canadians-hospitalized-each-day-for-opioid-poisoning"]

13 Canadians hospitalized each day for opioid poisoning
13 Canadians hospitalized each day for opioid poisoning

Defining success differently

submitted by Susie, Vancouver BC

My name is Susie and I have struggled for years with alcohol addiction.  I have had long periods of abstinence and have had some success in Alcoholics Anonymous.

But I have repeatedly relapsed and when I tried to quit cold turkey again, I found the period of agitation, restlessness and sleeplessness afterward so difficult it would interfere with my work.  I also beat myself up a lot and so envied others in the group who could proudly share they’d been 10 or 20 years without a drink.  It seemed so unattainable to me, it just made me feel worse.  The cravings would return and feeling so worthless, I would drink again.

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Defining success differently
Defining success differently

The right thing to do

submitted by Holden C., Vancouver BC

“This is not about politics. It’s simply the right thing to do.” - Demi Lovato addressing the DNC on the need for mental health investment and policy change

This system is broken.

There I was again, locked in a seclusion room on the second floor of a psychiatric facility. Trapped in a dilapidated hospital ward. I was a “frequent flyer”. That’s what the nurses called us – the patients unable to break the cycle of repeat hospitalizations. Unable to exit the revolving door. We had fallen through the system’s cracks. We deserved better.

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The right thing to do
The right thing to do

Statement by the Prime Minister of Canada on Mental Health Week

[embedlycard url="http://pm.gc.ca/eng/news/2017/05/01/statement-prime-minister-canada-mental-health-week"]

Statement by the Prime Minister of Canada on Mental Health Week
Statement by the Prime Minister of Canada on Mental Health Week

10 Ways To Improve Addictions Treatment, From Someone Who’s Been There

[embedlycard url="http://addictionthenextstep.com/blog/10-ways-improve-addictions-treatment/"]

10 Ways To Improve Addictions Treatment, From Someone Who’s Been There
10 Ways To Improve Addictions Treatment, From Someone Who’s Been There

A light at the end of the tunnel

submitted by UBC President Santa J. Ono

Mental health is a significant issue: one in five Canadians will have a mental health problem or illness this year. While conversations about mental health are now happening more frequently, many people are reluctant to talk about mental health, with 4 in 10 Canadian workers saying they would likely ignore or hide a mental illness diagnosis.

That is why I am heartened by the CMHA BC’s b4stage4 campaign, with its focus on prevention, early identification and early intervention.

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A light at the end of the tunnel
A light at the end of the tunnel

Read the blog at #b4stage4
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It's time we value mental health and addiction equally to physical health. Sign the @cmhabc #b4stage4 manifesto: